Archive for the ‘State Department Initatives’ Category

Black History Month 2011

Monday, February 7th, 2011

In 1861, as the United States stood at the brink of Civil War, people of African descent, both enslaved and free persons, waited with a watchful eye. They understood that a war between the North and the South might bring about jubilee–the destruction of slavery and universal freedom. When the Confederacy fired upon Fort Sumter and war ensued, President Abraham Lincoln maintained that the paramount cause was to preserve the Union, not end slavery. Frederick Douglass, the most prominent black leader, opined that regardless of intentions, the war would bring an end to slavery, America’s “peculiar institution.”

Over the course of the war, the four million people of African descent in the United States proved Douglass right. Free and enslaved blacks rallied around the Union flag in the cause of freedom. From the cotton and tobacco fields of the South to the small towns and big cities of the North, nearly 200,000 joined the Grand Army of the Republic and took up arms to destroy the Confederacy.

They served as recruiters, soldiers, nurses, and spies, and endured unequal treatment, massacres, and riots as they pursued their quest for freedom and equality. Their record of service speaks for itself, and Americans have never fully realized how their efforts saved the Union.

In honor of the efforts of people of African descent to destroy slavery and inaugurate universal freedom in the United States, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History has selected “African Americans and the Civil War” as the 2011 National Black History Theme. We urge all Americans to study and reflect on the value of their contributions to the nation.

Source: Association for the Study of African American Life and History


Black Soldiers in the Civil War

African American troops contributed greatly to the Union war effort

By Joyce Hansen
A four-time winner of the Coretta Scott King Honor Book Award, Joyce Hansen has published short stories and 15 books of contemporary and historical fiction and nonfiction for young readers, including Between Two Fires: Black Soldiers in the Civil War.

When the American Civil War began in 1861, Jacob Dodson, a free black man living in Washington, D.C., wrote to Secretary of War Simon Cameron informing him that he knew of “300 reliable colored free citizens” who wanted to enlist and defend the city. Cameron replied that “this department has no intention at present to call into the service of the government any colored soldiers.” It didn’t matter that black men, slave and free, had served in colonial militias and had fought on both sides of the Revolutionary War. Many black men felt that serving in the military was a way they might gain freedom and full citizenship.

Why did many military and civilian leaders reject the idea of recruiting black soldiers? Some said that black troops would prove too cowardly to fight white men, others said that they would be inferior fighters, and some thought that white soldiers would not serve with black soldiers. There were a few military leaders, though, who had different ideas.

On March 31, 1862, almost a year after the first shots of the Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Union (northern) troops commanded by General David Hunter took control of the islands off the coasts of northern Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina. Local whites who owned the rich cotton and rice plantations fled to the Confederate-controlled (southern) mainland. Most of their slaves remained on the islands, and they soon were joined by black escapees from the mainland who believed they would be liberated if only they could reach the Union lines. It would not be that simple.

Even as Hunter needed more soldiers to control the region’s many tidal rivers and islands against stubborn Confederate guerrilla resistance, he observed how escaping mainland slaves were swelling the islands’ black population. Perhaps, he reasoned, the African Americans could solve his manpower shortage. He devised a radical plan.

Hunter, a staunch abolitionist, took it upon himself to free the slaves — not just on the islands but through­out Confederate-controlled South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida — and to recruit black men capable of bearing arms as Union soldiers. He would attempt to train and form the first all-black regiment of the Civil War.

With the Emancipation Proclamation, the Union began to recruit African-American soldiers.

With the Emancipation Proclamation, the Union began to recruit African-American soldiers

News traveled slowly in those days, and President Abraham Lincoln did not hear about Hunter’s regiment until June. While Lincoln opposed slavery, he feared moving more quickly than public opinion in the embattled North — and particularly in the slaveholding border states that had sided with the Union — would allow. He also was adamant that “no commanding general shall do such a thing, upon my responsibility, without consulting me.” In an angry letter, the president informed the general that neither he nor any other subordinate had the right to free anyone, although he carefully asserted for himself the right to emancipate slaves at a time of his choosing. Hunter was ordered to disband the regiment, but the seed he planted soon sprouted.

In August 1862, two weeks after Hunter had dismantled his regiment, the War Department allowed General Rufus Saxton to raise the Union Army’s first official black regiment, the First South Carolina Volunteers. This and other black regiments organized in the coastal regions successfully defended and held the coastal islands for the duration of the war.

The First Kansas Colored Volunteers was also organized around this time, but without official War Department sanction. Meanwhile, President Lincoln had carefully laid the groundwork for emancipation and the inclusion of men of African descent into the military. As white northerners increasingly understood that black slaves were crucial to the Confederacy’s economy and to its war effort, Lincoln could justify freeing the slaves as matter of military necessity.

When Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, the military’s policy toward enslaved people became clearer. Those who reached the Union lines would be free. Also, the War Department began to recruit and enlist black troops for newly formed regiments of the Union Army — the United States Colored Troops (USCT). All of the officers in these regiments, however, would be white.

By the fall of 1864, some 140 black regiments had been raised in many northern states and in southern territories captured by the Union. About 180,000 African Americans served during the Civil War, including more than 75,000 northern black volunteers.

Although the black regiments were segregated from their white counterparts, they fought the same battles. Black troops performed bravely and successfully even though they coped with both the Confederate enemy and the suspicion of some of their Union military colleagues.

Once black men were accepted into the military, they were limited in many cases to garrison and fatigue duty. The famed Massachusetts 54th Regiment’s Colonel Robert Gould Shaw actively petitioned superiors to give his men a chance to engage in battle and prove themselves as soldiers. Some of the other officers who knew what their men could do did the same. Black troops had to fight to get the same pay as white soldiers. Some regiments refused to accept lower pay. It was not until 1865, the year the war ended, that Congress passed a law providing equal pay for black soldiers.

Despite these restrictions, the United States Colored Troops successfully participated in 449 military engagements, 39 of them major battles. They fought in battles in South Carolina, Louisiana, Florida, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, and other states. They bravely stormed forts and faced artillery knowing that if captured by the enemy, they would not be given the rights of prisoners of war, but instead would be sold into slavery. The black troops performed with honor and valor all of the duties of soldiers.

Despite the Army’s policy of only having white officers, eventually about 100 black soldiers rose from the ranks and were commissioned as officers. Eight black surgeons also received commissions in the USCT. More than a dozen USCT soldiers were given the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery.

In 1948, President Harry S. Truman ordered the desegregation of the armed forces. Today’s military remains an engine of social and economic opportunity for black Americans. But it was the sacrifices of the Civil War-era black soldiers that paved the way for the full acceptance of African Americans in the United States military. More fundamentally, their efforts were an important part of the struggle of African Americans for liberty and dignity.

This article is excerpted from the book Free At Last: The U.S. Civil Rights Movement, published by the Bureau of International Information Programs.

 

The African American Civil War Memorial Museum

The African American Civil War Memorial Museum opened to the public in January 1999. Using photographs, documents and state of the art audio visual equipment, the museum helps visitors understand the African American’s heroic and largely unknown struggle for freedom.

African American War Memorial

Slavery to Freedom: Civil War to Civil Rights

The Museum’s permanent exhibition portrays the extraordinatry African American struggle for freedom in the United States.

Descendants Registry

Tracing their lineage from USCT, more than 2,000 descendants have already supplied family trees, letters and other documents to the African American Civil War Memorial Freedom Foundation Registry. Visitors receive help in their search for relatives who may have served with USCT. Family members with soldiers who served with United States Colored Troops register in the Descendants Registry.

Computer Search for Your Soldier

Computer Search for your soldier via computers to the Internet and the National Park Service Civil War Soldiers and Sailors web site. The CWSS Names Index identifies black troops, along with their regiments, regimental histories, and information on 384 major Civil War battles.

The Gladstone Collection

Unrivalled, unique, worth more than $2,000,000 and priceless for those who want to understand the significance of USCT in the Fight for Freedom in the United States, this is one of the largest collections assembled about black participation in the Civil War. William Gladstone spent more than 20 years locating the well cataloged pieces that have been the subject of several books and major exhibits.

Source: The African American Civil War Memorial Museum, http://www.afroamcivilwar.org/

Black History Month Honors Legacy of Struggle and Triumph

By Louise Fenner

Washington — Each February, Black History Month honors the struggles and triumphs of millions of American citizens over the most devastating obstacles — slavery, prejudice, poverty — as well as their contributions to the nation’s cultural and political life.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, African Americans make up about 14 percent of the U.S. population and comprise the second-largest minority group, after Hispanics.

In 2009, the inauguration of Barack Obama, America’s first African-American president, lent Black History Month a special significance. Obama took the oath of office January 20, the day after Americans honored the memory of Martin Luther King Jr. with a federal holiday and national day of service.

In his inaugural address, Obama acknowledged the historical importance of a moment in which “a man whose father less than 60 years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.”

HONORING ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF BLACK AMERICANS
Black History Month was the inspiration of Carter G. Woodson, a noted scholar and historian, who instituted Negro History Week in 1926. He chose the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of President Abraham Lincoln and the abolitionist Frederick Douglass. The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Woodson, the son of former slaves in Virginia, realized that the struggles and achievements of Americans of African descent were being ignored or misrepresented. He founded the Association for the Study of
African American Life and History (ASALH), which supports historical research, publishes a scholarly journal and sets the theme for Black History Month each year.

John Fleming, ASALH president from 2007 to 2009 and director emeritus of the Cincinnati Museum Center, said Obama’s heritage — a black father born in Kenya and a white mother born in the United States — “continues to reflect the contributions Africans and Europeans have made to American history from the very beginning.”

Fleming said he believes Black History Month should focus on positive as well as negative aspects of the black experience. “Certainly, struggle has been an ongoing theme in our history from the very beginning. However, we were not slaves prior to being captured in Africa — and while slavery was part of our experience for 250 years, we have a hundred-and-some years in freedom that we also need to deal with.”

He said he has seen “substantial progress on many fronts,” but “at the same time there are still major problems that have to be addressed, one being the permanent underclass in urban areas now. We don’t seem to be able to break that cycle of poverty. And there are still some major rural pockets of poverty” such as in the Mississippi Delta.

“I’m glad to see the National African American Museum being developed on the Mall, which will tell a much broader story,” said Fleming. In 2003, President George W. Bush signed legislation to establish the new museum, which will be located on the National Mall near the Washington Monument. Although the new museum has not yet been built, it launched a photo exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery late in 2007 that is traveling to museums around the country through 2011.

“I think that African-American history gets more attention during February than during any other time of year, “ Fleming said, “and I think it’s an opportunity for us in the field to emphasize that it is something that should be studied throughout the year.”

Each year, the U.S. president honors Black History Month, or African-American History Month as it is also called, with a proclamation and a celebration at the White House. States and cities hold their own events around the country, and media feature topics related to black history.

ASALH has its headquarters in Washington, where Woodson lived from 1915 until his death in 1950. His home is designated a national historic site.

(This is a product of the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://www.america.gov)


Presidential Proclamation
National African American History Month

The great abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass once told us, “If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” Progress in America has not come easily, but has resulted from the collective efforts of generations. For centuries, African American men and women have persevered to enrich our national life and bend the arc of history toward justice. From resolute Revolutionary War soldiers fighting for liberty to the hardworking students of today reaching for horizons their ancestors could only have imagined, African Americans have strengthened our Nation by leading reforms, overcoming obstacles, and breaking down barriers. During National African American History Month, we celebrate the vast contributions of African Americans to our Nation’s history and identity.

This year’s theme, “African Americans and the Civil War,” invites us to reflect on 150 years since the start of the Civil War and on the patriots of a young country who fought for the promises of justice and equality laid out by our forbearers. In the Emancipation Proclamation, President Abraham Lincoln not only extended freedom to those still enslaved within rebellious areas, he also opened the door for African Americans to join the Union effort.

Tens of thousands of African Americans enlisted in the United States Army and Navy, making extraordinary sacrifices to help unite a fractured country and free millions from slavery. These gallant soldiers, like those in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, served with distinction, braving both intolerance and the perils of war to inspire a Nation and expand the domain of freedom. Beyond the battlefield, black men and women also supported the war effort by serving as surgeons, nurses, chaplains, spies, and in other essential roles. These brave Americans gave their energy, their spirit, and sometimes their lives for the noble cause of liberty.

Over the course of the next century, the United States struggled to deliver fundamental civil and human rights to African Americans, but African Americans would not let their dreams be denied. Though Jim Crow segregation slowed the onward march of history and expansion of the American dream, African Americans braved bigotry and violence to organize schools, churches, and neighborhood organizations. Bolstered by strong values of faith and community, black men and women have launched businesses, fueled scientific advances, served our Nation in the Armed Forces, sought public office, taught our children, and created groundbreaking works of art and entertainment. To perfect our Union and provide a better life for their children, tenacious civil rights pioneers have long demanded that America live up to its founding principles, and their efforts continue to inspire us.

Though we inherit the extraordinary progress won by the tears and toil of our predecessors, we know barriers still remain on the road to equal opportunity. Knowledge is our strongest tool against injustice, and it is our responsibility to empower every child in America with a world-class education from cradle to career. We must continue to build on our Nation’s foundation of freedom and ensure equal opportunity, economic security, and civil rights for all Americans. After a historic recession has devastated many American families, and particularly African Americans, we must continue to create jobs, support our middle class, and strengthen pathways for families to climb out of poverty.

During National African American History Month, we recognize the extraordinary achievements of African Americans and their essential role in shaping the story of America. In honor of their courage and contributions, let us resolve to carry forward together the promise of America for our children.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 2011 as National African American History Month. I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

BARACK OBAMA

The first official authorization to employ African Americans in federal service was the Second Confiscation and Militia Act of July 17, 1862.

Interesting facts about Black Soldiers in the Civil War

**By the end of the Civil War, roughly 179,000 black men (10% of the Union Army) served as soldiers in the U.S. Army and another 19,000 served in the Navy.

**”Nearly 40,000 black soldiers died over the course of the war—30,000 of infection or disease”

**On July 17, 1862, Congress passed the Second Confiscation and Militia Act, freeing slaves who had masters in the Confederate Army.

**Black women, who could not formally join the Army, nonetheless served as nurses, spies, and scouts, the most famous being Harriet Tubman , who scouted for the 2d South Carolina Volunteers.

**Black soldiers were initially paid $10 per month from which $3 was automatically deducted for clothing, resulting in a net pay of $7. In contrast, white soldiers received $13 per month from which no clothing allowance was drawn.

**In June 1864 Congress granted equal pay to the U.S. Colored Troops and made the action retroactive. Black soldiers received the same rations and supplies. In addition, they received comparable medical care.

**Black soldiers served in artillery and infantry and performed all non-combat support functions that sustain an army, as well. Black carpenters, chaplains, cooks, guards, laborers, nurses, scouts, spies, steamboat pilots, surgeons, and teamsters also contributed to the war cause.

**Because of prejudice against them, black units were not used in combat as extensively as they might have been. Nevertheless, the soldiers served with distinction in a number of battles. Black infantrymen fought gallantly at Milliken’s Bend, LA; Port Hudson, LA; Petersburg, VA; Nashville, TN” (and the assault on Fort Wagner, SC by the 54th Massachusetts.)

**By war’s end, 16 black soldiers had been awarded the Medal of Honor for their valor.

Source: The National Archives and Records Administration.

This Education & the Arts Post was produced by the Information Resource Center
Embassy of the United States

HUMAN RIGHTS DAY 2010

Friday, December 10th, 2010

The promotion and protection of human rights has been a major preoccupation for the United Nations since 1945, when the Organization’s founding nations resolved that the horrors of The Second World War should never be allowed to recur. The Day marks the anniversary of the Assembly’s adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. Over the years, a whole network of human rights instruments and mechanisms has been developed to ensure the primacy of human rights and to confront human rights violations wherever they occur.

One instrument the Department of State uses to disseminate information on the state of human rights around the world is its annual Human Rights Report (HRR). The HRR describes in detail human rights conditions in each country, and also contains recommended actions to promote improvement. It is used not only by American government officials but also by foreign governments (including Canada) as a reference tool.

In March of this year we held a digital video conference (DVC) to discuss the 2009 HRR, which had at that time recently been released. We connected with representatives from Bureau of Democracy, Rights and Labor in Washington, and hosted an audience that included contacts from Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs, Parliament, and Canadian NGOs. It was a good occasion for the parties to hold a candid discussion, and the audience had the opportunity to ask questions of the Bureau of Democracy, Rights and Labor’s Associate Deputy Secretary.

More generally, the U.S. Mission’s Public Affairs programs in Canada have included multiple activities that promote equality and acceptance within North American Civil Society. One in five Canadians are considered New Canadians, so much of our programming focuses on diversity and acceptance within Canada’s multi-faceted civil society. Examples of this type of programming include hosting an International Information Program (IIP) speaker on interreligious dialogue (see the post on Chantal McGill), bringing up two performers from The Hijabi Monologues to present their play for

The Hijabi Monologues

audiences in Ottawa and Halifax, and running a speaker program on shared North American Black historical and cultural connections. We’ve also done a speaker program on Domestic Violence with Beth Feder, and a speaker tour with an expert on governmental and non-governmental initiatives to promote the economic empowerment of minority women and communities with American expert speaker, Dr. Cheryl Shavers. We continue to work closely with individuals and organizations in the local community that also have a focus of mutual understanding within the religious and cultural communities. After all, human rights are best asserted through grass root initiatives!

If you’re interested in learning more about human rights, The Department of State has several resources available to the public, including publications, remarks, etc. We encourage you to read up, and SPEAK UP!

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Secretary Clinton on the Importance of Civil Society for Democracy

Clinton at the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women

Appointment of Adviser for International Disability Rights

Photo Gallery: The Evolution of Human Rights

Sixty Years: Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

America.gov publication, Human Rights in Brief

Happy International Education Week!!

Monday, November 15th, 2010

International Education Week (November 15 – 19) is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education is part of our efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn, and exchange experiences in the United States.

Canada is also observing International Education Week, its theme being “International Education: Building a Society for the 21st Century.”

Individuals, schools, colleges, universities, associations, businesses, governments, and nongovernmental organizations in both the U.S. and Canada will undertake activities to help strengthen understanding and highlight the importance of international education.

Check out the State Department’s International Education Week website and International Education Week Canada to find quizzes, resources, activites and events!

Upcoming Webchats from CO.NX

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

CO.NX has two new webchats coming up this week:

 

Native American Culture and Heritage
Thursday, October 28 (TOMORROW)
9:00 am EDT (13:00 GMT)
https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/special

Description: Honor Native American Heritage Month and learn about an important aspect of U.S. history, culture, and society by participating in this program. Discuss the challenges faced by native populations, minorities and displaced peoples in diverse societies worldwide. This will be a video webchat in English.

Guest Speaker: Mr. Dennis Zotigh. Before joining the staff of National Museum of the American Indian, Mr. Zotigh played an important role in developing the American Indian Gallery of the new Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in the capacity of American Indian Researcher and Historian.

Instructions: Visit https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/special on Thursday, October 28 at 9:00am EDT (13:00 GMT). You may enter as our guest by simply typing in your name and selecting “Enter Room.” To submit your questions in advance, simply post your question in our chat room at https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/special .

________________________________________
Women in Agriculture
Friday, October 29
09:00 am EDT (13:00 GMT)
https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/women

Description: World Food Prize Laureate of 2003, Ms. Catherine Bertini will discuss the U.S. Feed the Future initiative, which targets the Millennium Development Goal of reducing hunger and poverty. Feed the Future highlights the importance of providing women in agriculture more access to resources. Ms. Bertini will also discuss women in agriculture and agri-business in East Africa. Ms. Catherine Bertini was chosen as the 2003 World Food Prize Laureate for transforming the United Nations World Food Program into the largest and most responsive humanitarian relief organization in the world. Ms. Bertini currently works as a professor of public administration at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. This will be a text-only webchat in English.
Instructions: Visit https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/women on Friday, October 29 at 09:00 am EDT (13:00GMT). You may enter as our guest by simply typing in your name and selecting “Enter Room.” To submit your questions in advance, simply post your question in our chat room at https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/women .

2011 “Doors to Diplomacy” Web Competition for Students

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

The Department of State and the Global SchoolNet Foundation announce the 2011 “Doors to Diplomacy” award competition, recognizing the student-created Global SchoolNet Web projects that best teach others about the importance of international affairs and diplomacy.

To qualify, middle school and high school students will work in small teams with teacher-coaches. Projects must be completed by March 15, 2011, and winners will be announced in May 2011. Every team that enters a project will receive a special “Doors to Diplomacy” certificate recognizing their achievement. Each student member of the two winning teams – one American and one international – will also receive a $2,000 scholarship, and the winning coaches’ schools will each receive a $500 cash award!

For a complete description and information about eligibility and judging criteria, visit http://globalschoolnet.org/gsndoors/.

For more information, contact:

Dr. Yvonne Marie Andres
Global SchoolNet
Telephone: 760-635-0001
E-mail: diplomacy@globalschoolnet.org

or

Wanda Ramsey
U.S. Department of State
E-mail: ramseywc@state.gov

…And the 2010 Grant Recipients Are…

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

May and September 2010 Grant Award Recipients of the U.S. Mission in Canada American Studies-Community Partnership
Grant Competitions

Ontario HIV Treatment Network: North American Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit, Toronto, Ontario (May Award)

Project Overview: The Ontario HIV Treatment Network’s award funded the participation of U.S. experts in the North American Housing and HIV/AIDS Research Summit held June 2-4, 2010 in Toronto. More than 250 community members, academic researchers and policy makers from Canada and the United States shared new research, brainstormed new ideas, and formed new partnerships as they focused on the connection between housing and health concerns for people with HIV/AIDS.

Rolling Darkness Review, Ottawa, Ontario (May Award)

Project Overview: The award to the “Rolling Darkness Review” (RDR), a multi-media experience incorporating live music and ghost story readings, will provide a remarkable Canadian-American exchange, exposing Canadian audiences to some of America’s finer horror writing talents, providing a forum for questions and answers and academic exchanges, and granting spectators an opportunity to discover new American authors, ideas and books. Following the Writers Festival, the program will also venture to northern Ontario for additional performances.

Cross Border Pollination Series (Simon Fraser University), Vancouver (May Award)

Project Overview: The “Cross-Border Pollination” project is a community and cross-cultural exchange program between Canadian and American writers and readers. Not only will the authors collaborate with one another in a dynamic evening of shared readings, they will also offer up a literary feast to audiences in bookstores and libraries in Vancouver to people whose only common interest is love of the written word.

Calgary International Film Festival, Calgary, Alberta (September Award)

Project Overview: The Calgary International Film Festival‘s objective is sharing with Canadians the new cinematic talent emerging from the U.S. as well as creating greater mutual understanding between the two nations. This year’s festival will screen fifteen feature films created by American independent artists in attendance for the screening, participating in a question and answer period afterwards. The American filmmakers will also have an opportunity to connect with others in the Canadian film industry.

Alberta Institute of American Studies at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (September Award)

Project Overview: The Alberta Institute for American Studies Speakers’ Series brings knowledgeable individuals from the United States to give public lectures at the University of Alberta. The Institute will expand its Speakers’ Series and introduce a new Video-Seminar Series at the University. The new video-seminar series will link University of Alberta departments with institutions in the United States. These seminars will address significant topics in American Studies.

Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (September Award)

Project Overview: The Centre has planned a one-day workshop that will bring together key policymakers from relevant government departments in Canada, policy experts and government official from the United States and Canada, representatives of international donor agencies working in the Caribbean, private sector and civil society representatives, and others who can bring practical experience to the discussion of Canadian-United States economic development cooperation in the Caribbean and make policy recommendations. The workshop will highlight a case study completed by graduate students and their faculty advisors entitled “U.S. – Canada Cooperation on Mainstreaming SME Finance in the Caribbean,” also a component of the project.

McGill Institute for the Study of Canada at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (September Award)

Project Overview: The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada will host a two-and-a-half day conference on the Canada-U.S. relationship. The conference will bring together historians, former and current politicians, policy-makers, journalists, interested stakeholders and academics to address a broad range of issues affecting the two countries, such as, history, policy-making, the current state of the Canada-U.S. relationship, security and trade issues, and the fundamental differences in how the media portrays issues (health care, climate change, security, etc) in Canada and the U.S.

Carrousel International Film Festival for Children and Youth, Rimouski, Quebec (September Award)

Project Overview: The organizers of the 28th Carrousel International Film Festival for Children and Youth in Rimouski, Quebec have aimed at their project at expanding the American studies participation in community projects and activities that provide participants with new/expanded educational and cultural opportunities in Canada. The award will assist in bringing American film directors to the Festival who will share their expertise and their film in public screening and lecture as well as in classroom settings.

American Society for Ethnohistory at the University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (September Award)

Project Overview: The American Society for Ethnohistory is holding its 2010 Annual Meeting in Ottawa in October. Hundreds of scholars from across the Americas will focus on indigenous societies and their relations with expanding colonial and modern state structure of Canada, America and Latin America. The conference will address the relationship between Native societies and expanding state structure in the Americas. The meeting will be a forum to encourage discussions and reflection on alternative models of indigenous nation building, displacement and violence in the interior, and the vast process of native inclusion and exclusion in the construction of modern states.

Vancouver International Dance Festival, Vancouver, British Columbia (September Award)

Project Overview: The Vancouver International Dance Company’s project is a partnership between Canadian and American dance organizations as well as one that highlights the dance performance of the Khambatta Dance Company from Seattle, Washington. The project engages American Studies cultural practitioners in genuine collaborations with community organizers and the constituents they serve.

Winnipeg Cinematheque Theatre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (September Award)

Project Overview: Winnipeg Cinematheque Theatre is sponsoring a four-day documentary forum “Gimme Some Truth” that is a combination seminar, screening program, and craft workshop series that will provide the local film-making community and audiences the opportunity to learn about the documentary film practice and creative, technical, distribution, and ethical issues related to the practice and production of these works. The forum includes master classes and technical workshops in a program aimed at a post secondary audience.

MORE CALLS FOR NOMINATIONS: 2011 STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES INSTITUTUES FOR SCHOLARS

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

INSTITUTE DESCRIPTION

Study of the United States Institutes are intensive post-graduate level academic programs with integrated study tours whose purpose is to provide foreign university faculty and other scholars the opportunity to deepen their understanding of American society, culture, and institutions. The ultimate goal is to strengthen curricula and to improve the quality of teaching about the United States in academic institutions abroad.

The institutes will take place at various colleges and universities throughout the United States over the course of six weeks beginning in June 2011. Applicants are encouraged to visit our website to obtain general information about the FY10 Institutes, http://exchanges.state.gov/academicexchanges/scholars.html

A. The Institute on American Politics and Political Thought will provide a multinational group of 18 foreign university faculty with a deeper understanding of U.S. political institutions and major currents in American political thought. The institute will provide the participants insight into how intellectual and political movements have influenced modern American political institutions. The institute will provide an overview of political thought during the founding period (constitutional foundations), and the development and current functioning of the American presidency, Congress and the federal judiciary. The examination of political institutions will include the electoral system, political parties and interest groups, the civil service system, media and think tanks, and the welfare/regulatory state. The institute will address modern political and cultural issues in the United States (including but not limited to civil rights, women’s rights, immigration, etc.) and the significance of public discourse in the formulation of public policy.

B. The Institute on Contemporary American Literature will provide a multinational group of up to 18 foreign university faculty and scholars with a deeper understanding of U.S. society and culture, past and
present, through an examination of contemporary American literature. Its purpose is twofold: to explore contemporary American writers and writing in a variety of genres; and to suggest how the themes explored in those works reflect larger currents within contemporary American society and culture. The program will explore the diversity of the American literary landscape, examining how major contemporary writers, schools and movements reflect the traditions of the American literary canon. At the same time, the program will expose participants to writers who represent a departure from that tradition, and who are establishing new directions for American literature.

C. The Institute on Journalism and Media will provide a multinational group of 18 journalism faculty and other related specialists with a deeper understanding of the role of journalism and the media in U.S. society. It will examine major topics in journalism, including the concept of a free press, First Amendment rights, and the media’s relationship to the public interest. The legal and ethical questions inherent in journalistic endeavors will be incorporated into every aspect of the institute. The institute will cover strategies for teaching students of journalism the basics of the tradecraft: researching, reporting, writing, and editing. The program will also highlight technology’s impact on journalism, addressing the influence of the internet, the globalization of the news media, the growth of satellite television and radio networks, and other advances in media that are transforming the profession.

D. The Institute on Religious Pluralism in the United States will provide a multinational group of up to 18 foreign university faculty and practitioners with a deeper understanding of U.S. society and culture, past and present, through an examination of religious pluralism in the United States and its intersection with American democracy. Employing a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing on fields such as history, political science, sociology, anthropology, law and others where appropriate, the program will explore both the historical and contemporary relationship between church and state in the United States. Participants will examine the following aspects of religious pluralism in the United States: the ways in which religious thought and practice have influenced, and been influenced by, the development of American-style democracy; the intersections of religion and politics in the United States in such areas as elections, public policy, and foreign policy; and the sociology and demography of religion in the United States today, including a survey of the diversity of contemporary religious beliefs and its impact on American politics.

E. The Institute on U.S. Culture and Society will provide a multinational group of 18 experienced and highly-motivated foreign university faculty and other specialists with a deeper understanding of U.S. society, culture, values, and institutions. The Institute will examine the ethnic, racial, economic, political, and religious contexts in which various cultures have manifested themselves in U.S. society, and the ways in which these cultures have influenced both social movements and historical epochs throughout U.S. history. The program will draw from a diverse disciplinary base, and will itself provide a model of how a foreign university might approach the study of U.S. culture and society.

F. The Institute on U.S. Foreign Policy will provide a multinational group of 18 foreign university faculty and scholars with a deeper understanding of how U.S. foreign policy is formulated and implemented with an emphasis on the post Cold War period. This institute will begin with a review of the historical development of U.S. foreign policy and cover significant events, individuals, and philosophies that have dominated U.S. foreign policy. In addition, the institute will explain the role of key players in the field of foreign policy, including the executive and legislative branches, the media, public opinion, think-tanks, non-governmental and international organizations and how these players debate, cooperate, influence policy, and are held accountable.

OTHER ESSENTIAL PROGRAM INFORMATION

A. Program Funding: All participant costs, including: international travel, program administration; domestic travel and ground transportation; book, cultural, housing and subsistence, mailing, and incidental allowances will be covered.

B. Housing and Meal Arrangements: Typically, participants will have a private room with a shared bathroom during the residency portion (four weeks) of the institute, and may share a hotel room with another participant of the same gender during the study tour (up to two weeks). Housing will typically be in college or university owned housing. Most meals will be provided at campus facilities, though participants may have access to a kitchen to cook some meals on their own. Full details will be provided once the grants have been approved.

C. Health Benefits: All participants will receive the Department of State’s coverage of $50,000 with a $25 deductible for the duration of the program. Pre-existing conditions are not covered.

D. Program Requirements and Restrictions: Participants are expected to participate fully in the program. They are expected to attend all lectures and organized activities, and complete assigned readings. Family members and/or friends cannot accompany participants on any part of the program. Please note that teaching methodology and pedagogical methods will not be addressed formally in the institute. The institute is intensive and there will be little time for personal pursuits unrelated to the program. The institute should not be viewed as a research program.

CANDIDATE DESCRIPTION AND QUALIFICATIONS

A. Candidates should be mid-career, typically between the ages of 30-50, highly-motivated and experienced professionals from institutions of higher education. While the educational level of participants will likely vary, most should have graduate degrees and have substantial knowledge of the thematic area of the Institute.

B. The ideal candidate will also be an experienced professional with little or no prior experience in the United States, whose home institution is seeking to introduce aspects of U.S. studies into its curricula, to develop new courses in the subject of the institute, to enhance and update existing courses on the United States, or to offer specialized seminars/workshops for professionals in U.S. studies areas related to the program theme. In this respect, while the nominee’s scholarly and professional credentials are an important consideration, an equally important factor is how participation in the institute will enhance course offerings in U.S. studies at the nominee’s home institution.

C. Candidates should be willing and able to fully take part in an intensive post-graduate level academic program and study tour.

OTHER FACTORS FOR CONSIDERATION

A. Candidate Statement: In order to get a better sense of potential participants’ motivations and goals, each candidate is requested to provide a short personal statement (one page) indicating why he or she is interested in participating in the program and what he or she expects to get out of the experience. See paragraph 7, T below for more details.

B. English Language Ability: It is imperative that all candidates demonstrate English language fluency. Institutes are rigorous and demanding programs; participants will be expected to handle substantial
reading assignments in English and to be full and active participants in all seminar and panel discussions. English fluency is vital to a successful experience in the Institute, both for your participant and participants from other countries.

C. Priority Consideration: Priority will be given to candidates who have firm plans to enhance, update or develop courses and/or educational materials with a U.S. studies focus or component, who have limited experience in the United States, and who have special interest in the program subject areas as demonstrated through past scholarship, accomplishments, and professional duties

NOMINATION FORMAT

Applications for consideration must be received by the U.S. Embassy no later than Friday, November 19, 2010. All nominations must follow the format below. It is essential that all items are completely accurate.

A. Title of Institute

B. Nominee’s Full Name: Nominee’s names should match his/her passport and should be presented in the following order: Prefix (Dr., Mr., Mrs., Ms., Miss), Last Name(s), First Name, Middle Name.

C. Gender

D. Date of Birth (please spell out Month, Day, Year)

E. Birth City

F. Birth Country

G. Country(ies) of Citizenship: Primary and, if applicable, secondary country

H. Country of Residence

I. Medical, Physical, Dietary or other Personal Considerations: Please describe any pre-existing medical conditions, including any prescription medication the candidate maybe taking, or any other dietary or personal considerations. This will not affect candidate selection, but will enable the host institution to make any necessary accommodations.

J. Candidate Contact Information: Home Address, City, Home State/Province, Home Country, E-mail, and Telephone.

K. Current Position Type, Title, Institutional Name, and Country.

For “Position Type,” please select one from among the following: 1) Senior Executive, President, Government Minister, etc.; 2) Junior Executive, Vice President, Dean, Government Advisor, etc.; 3) Professor, Editor, Officer, Director, etc.; 4) Associate Professor, Senior Researcher, Senior Staff, etc.; 5) Assistant Professor, Assistant Editor, Coordinator, Staff; 6) Lecturer, Teacher, Consultant; 7) Teaching Assistant, Instructor; or, 8.) Other.

L. Work Experience, including previous positions and titles, and the approximate dates of employment.

M. Education, and Academic and Professional Training, including degree earned and fields of specialization. Degrees listed should reflect the closest U.S. equivalent.

N. Active Professional Memberships. Please select from among the following position types to describe the level of the candidate’s involvement with the organizations listed; 1) President, Board Chairperson, Director; 2) Board Member; 3) Editorial Staff, Officer; 4) Contributing Member; 5) Member.

O. Publications: Publications should include the publication year, type of publication, title, and publisher. All foreign titles should be translated into English. (Maximum 10 publications.)

To identify the publication type, please choose from among the following options: 1) Book; 2) Edited volume (as primary or co-editor); 3) Book chapter; 4) Journal article; 5) Newspaper/ online article; or, 6) Conference/University/ Government working paper.

P. Previous Experience in the United States: Please list all trips the candidate has made to the United States and include approximate dates and the reason for travel.

Q. Family Residing in the United States: Please list any immediate family members who currently are residing in the United States, including city and state.

R. Evidence of English Fluency (e.g. personal interview, test score, etc.)

S. Professional Responsibilities:

Current Courses Taught- Should include the course title, level of student (Ph.D., M.A., Undergraduate, High School), number of hours per semester, number of students, and the estimated percent of U.S. studies content.

Current Student Advising- Should include the number of students advised who are studying U.S. related topics, level of students (Ph.D., M.A., Undergraduate, High School), and the number of advising hours.

Other Potential Outcomes- Please select all of the likely potential outcomes that might result from the candidate’s participation in this institute: 1) Update Existing Course; 2) Create New Course; 3) Create New Degree Program; 4) University Curriculum Redesign; 5) National Curriculum Redesign; 6) New Research Project; 7) New Publication; 8.) Professional Promotion; 9) Government or Ministry Policy; 10) New Professional Organization; 11) New Institutional Linkages; 12) Raise Institutional Profile.

T. Personal Essays to be written by nominees, limit 4,500 characters each. 1) Please discuss your professional responsibilities in greater detail, including how attending this Institute would help you achieve the “Other Potential Outcomes” you have checked above; AND 2) Please discuss how your participation would enhance this Institute, based either upon your personal and professional experience or upon the current state of U.S. studies in your home country.

Applications should be submitted via e-mail to meriwetherc@state.gov by Friday, November 19, 2010.

CALLS FOR NOMINATIONS: SUMMER 2011 STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES INSTITUTES FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATORS

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

INSTITUTE DESCRIPTION 

The Study of the United States Institutes for Secondary School Educators will provide two multinational groups of 30 secondary educators each (classroom teachers, teacher trainers, curriculum developers, textbook writers, ministry of education officials, etc.) with a deeper understanding of U.S. society, education, and culture, past and present. The programs will be organized around a central theme or themes in U.S. studies and will have a strong contemporary component. Through a combination of traditional, multi-disciplinary, and interdisciplinary approaches, the programs will elucidate the history and evolution of U.S. educational institutions and values. The programs also serve to illuminate contemporary political, social, and economic debates in American society.

The ultimate goal of the programs is to strengthen curricula and to improve the quality of teaching about the United States in secondary schools and other academic institutions abroad.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit our website to obtain general information about the Institutes at: http://exchanges.state.gov/academicexchanges/scholars.html 

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Program Funding: Through grants to the host institutions, all participants’ costs including costs for program administration, domestic travel and ground transportation, housing and subsistence, books, cultural activities, mail, and incidentals are covered.

Housing and Meal Arrangements: Typically, participants will have private rooms with a shared bathroom during the residency portion (four weeks) of the institute, and will share a hotel room during the study tour (up to two weeks). Housing will usually be in college or university-owned housing. Most meals will be provided at campus facilities; however, participants may have access to a kitchen to cook some meals on their own.

Health Benefits: All participants will receive the Department of State’s coverage of $50,000 with a $25 deductible for the duration of the program. Pre-existing conditions are not covered.

Program Requirements and Restrictions: Participants are expected to participate fully in the program. They are expected to attend all lectures and organized activities, and to complete assigned readings. Family members and/or friends cannot accompany participants on any part of the program. Please note that teaching methodology and pedagogical methods will not be addressed formally in the institute. Candidates should be made aware that this is an intensive institute and there will be little time for personal pursuits unrelated to the program. The institute should not be viewed as a research program.

CANDIDATE DESCRIPTION AND QUALIFICATIONS

A. Candidates should be mid-career, typically between the ages of 30-50, highly-motivated and experienced secondary school educators. The ideal candidate will be a secondary teacher, teacher trainer, curriculum developer, textbook writer, ministry of education official, or other
related professional with responsibility for secondary education who is seeking to introduce or enhance aspects of U.S. studies into his/her curricula.

B. The ideal candidate will also be an experienced professional with little or no prior experience in the United States, whose home institution is seeking to introduce aspects of U.S. studies into its curricula, to develop new courses in the subject of the institute, to enhance and update existing courses on the United States, or to offer specialized seminars/workshops for education professionals in U.S. studies.

C. Candidates should be willing and able to take part fully in an intensive post-graduate level academic program and study tour. While senior educators are eligible applicants, first consideration to younger and mid-career professionals and to persons who are likely to be comfortable with campus life and an active program schedule.

OTHER FACTORS FOR CONSIDERATION

Candidate Statement: In order to get a better sense of potential participants’ motivations and goals, we request that each candidate provide a short personal statement (one page) indicating why he or she is interested in participating in the program and what he or she expects to get out of the experience. See NOMINATION FORMAT, point T, below for more details.

English Language Ability: It is imperative that all candidates demonstrate English language fluency. Institutes are rigorous and demanding programs; participants will be expected to handle substantial reading assignments in English and to be full and active participants in all seminar and panel discussions. English fluency is vital to a successful experience in the Institute.

Priority Consideration: Priority will be given to candidates who have firm plans to enhance, update or develop courses and/or educational materials with a U.S. studies focus or component, who have limited experience in the United States, and who have special interest in the program subject areas as demonstrated through past scholarship, accomplishments, and professional duties.

NOMINATION FORMAT

Applications for consideration must be received by the U.S. Embassy no later than Friday, November 19, 2010. All nominations must follow the format below. It is essential that all items are completely accurate.

A. Title of Institute

B. Nominee’s Full Name: Nominee’s names should match his/her passport and should be presented in the following order: Prefix (Dr., Mr., Mrs., Ms., Miss), Last Name(s), First Name, Middle Name.

C. Gender

D. Date of Birth (please spell out Month, Day, Year)

E. Birth City

F. Birth Country

G. Country(ies) of Citizenship: Primary and, if applicable, secondary country

H. Country of Residence

I. Medical, Physical, Dietary or other Personal Considerations: Please describe any pre-existing medical conditions, including any prescription medication the candidate maybe taking, or any other dietary or personal considerations. This will not affect candidate selection, but will enable the host institution to make any necessary accommodations.

J. Candidate Contact Information: Home Address, City, Home State/Province, Home Country, E-mail, and Telephone Number.

K. Current Position Type, Title, Institutional Name, and Country.

For “Position Type,” please select one from among the following: 1) Senior Executive, President, Government Minister, etc.; 2) Junior Executive, Vice President, Dean, Government Advisor, etc.; 3) Professor, Editor, Officer, Director, etc.; 4) Associate Professor, Senior Researcher, Senior Staff, etc.; 5) Assistant Professor, Assistant Editor, Coordinator, Staff; 6) Lecturer, Teacher, Consultant; 7) Teaching Assistant, Instructor; or, 8.) Other.

L. Work Experience, including previous positions and titles, and the approximate dates of employment.

M. Education, and Academic and Professional Training, including degree earned and fields of specialization. Degrees listed should reflect the closest U.S. equivalent.

N. Active Professional Memberships. Please select from among the following position types to describe the level of the candidate’s involvement with the organizations listed; 1) President, Board Chairperson, Director; 2) Board Member; 3) Editorial Staff, Officer; 4) Contributing Member; 5) Member.

O. Publications: Publications should include the publication year, type of publication, title, and publisher. All foreign titles should be translated into English. (Maximum 10 publications.)

To identify the publication type, please choose from among the following options: 1) Book; 2) Edited volume (as primary or co-editor); 3) Book chapter; 4) Journal article; 5) Newspaper/ online article; or, 6) Conference/University/ Government working paper.

P. Previous Experience in the United States: Please list all trips the candidate has made to the United States and include approximate dates and the reason for travel.

Q. Family Residing in the United States: Please list any immediate family members who currently are residing in the United States, including city and state.

R. Evidence of English Fluency

S. Professional Responsibilities:

Current Courses Taught- Should include the course title, level of student (Ph.D., M.A., Undergraduate, High School), number of hours per semester, number of students, and the estimated percent of U.S. studies content.

Current Student Advising- Should include the number of students advised who are studying U.S. related topics, level of students (Ph.D., M.A., Undergraduate, High School), and the number of advising hours.

Other Potential Outcomes- Please select all of the likely potential outcomes that might result from the candidate’s participation in this institute: 1) Update Existing Course; 2) Create New Course; 3) Create New Degree Program; 4) University Curriculum Redesign; 5) National Curriculum Redesign; 6) New Research Project; 7) New Publication; 8.) Professional Promotion; 9) Government or Ministry Policy; 10) New Professional Organization; 11) New Institutional Linkages; 12) Raise Institutional Profile.

T. Personal Essays to be written by nominees, limited to 4,500 characters each. 1) Please discuss your professional responsibilities in greater detail, including how attending this Institute would help you achieve the “Other Potential Outcomes” you have checked above; AND 2) Please discuss how your participation would enhance this Institute, based either upon your personal and professional experience or upon the current state of U.S. studies in your home country.

Applications should be submitted via e-mail to meriwetherc@state.gov by Friday, November 19, 2010.

An Autumn Array: Webchats, a Writers Festival, and Hispanic Heritage Month

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Join America.gov’s series of programs on climate change. All start at 8:00 a.m. EDT (1200 GMT) the day of the program (8:00 a.m. EST, 1300 GM).  Read more!

Next one coming up:
“Can We Slow Down Climate Change?”
Date: Wednesday, October 13
Speaker: Rick Duke, deputy assistant secretary for climate policy, U.S. Department of Energy

 Hey Booklovers!  Will you be in Canada’s National Capital Region this month? Check out the 2010 Ottawa International Writers Festival!  The main events are happening October 20-26, but a few “preface-tival” events are scheduled over the next few weeks.  (Get it? Preface – like in a book… and pre-festival…?) (As mentioned in the previous entry… it’s been a long September.)

Anyway, Saturday, October 23rd at 8:30pm is the Rolling Darkness Review Premiere at the Mayfare Theatre with American Horror novelists Glen Hirshberg and Peter Atkins.  It’s a sure bet to put you into full-on Halloween mode.

The full Writers Festival schedule is available here.

Last but not least, September 15 – October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month!  Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month by celebrating the cultures and contributions of American citizens who came from — or whose ancestors came from — Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.  Brush up on your Spanish and visit these resource links:

White House Proclamation: National Hispanic Heritage Month
“We honor Hispanics for enriching the fabric of America, even as we recognize and rededicate ourselves to addressing the challenges to equality and opportunity that many Hispanics still face,” says the National Hispanic Heritage Month 2010 presidential proclamation.

President Obama also proclaimed National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week. Each year, the president welcomes distinguished Hispanic leaders, educators and artists to the White House.

The Library of Congress offers a Web portal on National Hispanic Heritage Month. It also sponsors StoryCorps Historias, which collects oral histories from Latinos in the United States.

The Smithsonian Institution celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month and also has the Smithsonian Latino Center, which focuses on Latino heritage and culture in the United States.

BY THE WAY, just because we’re in Canada doesn’t mean we only look for English and French speaking candidates for programs and exchanges.  We would love to send more SPANISH-SPEAKING Canadians on Western Hemisphere programs!  If you’re fluent Spanish-speaking mover & shaker (any age)… CONTACT US!

Upcoming Webchats Focus on Interfaith and Educational Exchanges in the U.S.

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010

CO.NX is an online State Department program that brings you live multimedia events with experts on a variety of topics.  Their goal is to connect with people around the world in order to gain a mutual understanding on a range of important issues.  

Be sure to check out two new webcasts from the Team:

Muslim Life in America is a live webchat happening next Wednesday, September 15th at 6:30am EDT.  Chat with American Imam Ghayth Nur Kashifabout about Muslim life and the celebration of Ramadan in the U.S.
Imam Kashif is resident Imam for Masjidush-Shura in Washington, D.C. He was a founding member of the American Muslim Council and director of Congressional Affairs. Sign up to participate at: https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/interfaith
Visit that same site to submit your questions in advance.

The second webchat is for those of you interested in educational exchanges. Erica Lutes, Educational Adviser at the Fulbright Commission in Brussels, Belgium, will discuss Studying Abroad in the United States. The “Studying Abroad” webchat will take place at 4:00am EDT on Tuesday, September 21st. Visit https://statedept.connectsolutions.com/information to sign up.

By the way – if you’re not an early riser, transcripts of both webcasts will be available HERE at the CO.NX website.

(CO.NX  = Connects… get it? …I just did.)